Enviropedia
Climate Change
Global Warming
Ozone
Air Pollution
Weather & Climate
Sustainability
Kids
INFORMATION
Climate System
Climate Change
Empirical Study
Climate Models
Palaeoclimates
Global Warming
Introduction
Greenhouse Effect
Enhanced G-Effect
Greenhouse Gases
 - Carbon Dioxide
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Carbon Cycle
   - Concentrations
   - Equilibrium
 - Methane
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Concentrations
 - Nitrous Oxide
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Concentrations
 - Halocarbons
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Concentrations
 - Ozone
 - Other Trace Gases
 - Adjustment Time
 - Summary
Greenhouse Forcing
 - Forcing Factors
 - GWPs
 - ΔF-ΔC Relationships
 - 1765 to 1990
 - Ozone
Aerosols
 - Aerosols
 - Radiative Forcing
   - Direct
   - Indirect
 - Total Forcing
Climate Variations
 - Surface Temperature
 - Precipitation
 - Other Variations
   - Stratosphere
   - Cryosphere
   - Circulation
   - Cloudiness
Detection
 - Modelling
 - Attribution
   - Latitudes
   - Stratosphere
   - Precipitation
   - Sea Level Rise
   - Fingerprints
 - When?
Future Climate
 - GCM Simulations
 - Feedbacks
   - Water Vapour
   - Clouds
   - Ice Albedo
   - Greenhouse Gases
 - 21st Century
Impacts
 - Agriculture
 - Forestry
 - Ecosystems
 - Water Resources
 - Oceans & Coasts
 - Humans & Health
Responses
 - Stabilising
 - FCCC
 - Kyoto Protocol
 - UK Programme
   - Energy Demand
   - Energy Supply
 - Evaluation
Conclusion
LINKS
Navigate

4.4.3. Statistical-Dynamical Models

Statistical-dynamical models (SDMs) are generally 2-D in form, with usually one horizontal and one vertical dimension, though variants with two horizontal dimensions have been developed. Standard SDMs combine the horizontal energy transfer modelled by EBMs with the radiative-convective approach of RCMs. However, the equator-to-pole energy transfer is simulated in a more sophisticated manner, based on theoretical and empirical relationships of the cellular flow between latitudes.

Parameters such as wind speed and wind direction are modelled by statistical relations whilst the laws of motion are used to obtain a measure of energy diffusion as in an EBM. Hence the description statistical-dynamical. They are particular useful in investigations of the role of horizontal energy transfer, and the processes which disturb that transfer directly.