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Climate System
Climate Change
Empirical Study
Climate Models
Palaeoclimates
Global Warming
Introduction
Greenhouse Effect
Enhanced G-Effect
Greenhouse Gases
 - Carbon Dioxide
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Carbon Cycle
   - Concentrations
   - Equilibrium
 - Methane
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Concentrations
 - Nitrous Oxide
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Concentrations
 - Halocarbons
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Concentrations
 - Ozone
 - Other Trace Gases
 - Adjustment Time
 - Summary
Greenhouse Forcing
 - Forcing Factors
 - GWPs
 - ΔF-ΔC Relationships
 - 1765 to 1990
 - Ozone
Aerosols
 - Aerosols
 - Radiative Forcing
   - Direct
   - Indirect
 - Total Forcing
Climate Variations
 - Surface Temperature
 - Precipitation
 - Other Variations
   - Stratosphere
   - Cryosphere
   - Circulation
   - Cloudiness
Detection
 - Modelling
 - Attribution
   - Latitudes
   - Stratosphere
   - Precipitation
   - Sea Level Rise
   - Fingerprints
 - When?
Future Climate
 - GCM Simulations
 - Feedbacks
   - Water Vapour
   - Clouds
   - Ice Albedo
   - Greenhouse Gases
 - 21st Century
Impacts
 - Agriculture
 - Forestry
 - Ecosystems
 - Water Resources
 - Oceans & Coasts
 - Humans & Health
Responses
 - Stabilising
 - FCCC
 - Kyoto Protocol
 - UK Programme
   - Energy Demand
   - Energy Supply
 - Evaluation
Conclusion
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1.2.1.1. Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide (CO2), the most important of these minor gases, is involved in a complex global cycle (see section 6.4.1). It is released from the interior of the Earth via volcanic eruptions, and by respiration, soil processes, combustion of carbon compounds and oceanic evaporation. Conversely, it is dissolved in the oceans and consumed during plant photosynthesis. Currently, there are 359 parts per million by volume (ppmv) of CO2 in the atmosphere (Schimel et al., 1995), a concentration which is continuing to rise due to anthropogenic (man-made) emissions from the burning of fossil fuels and forests. The implications of this are discussed in chapter 6.