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3.3.5. Terrestrial Sediments

The range of non-marine sediment studies providing relevant palaeoclimatic information is vast. Aeolian, glacial, lacustrine and fluvial deposits are, to a greater degree, a function of climate, though it is often difficult to distinguish specific causes of climatic change. Erosional features such as ancient lacustrine or marine shorelines, or glacial striae also reveal a palaeoclimatic signal. A number of these are discussed in the following sub-sections.