Enviropedia
Climate Change
Global Warming
Ozone
Air Pollution
Weather & Climate
Sustainability
Kids
INFORMATION
Climate System
Climate Change
Empirical Study
Climate Models
Palaeoclimates
Global Warming
Introduction
Greenhouse Effect
Enhanced G-Effect
Greenhouse Gases
 - Carbon Dioxide
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Carbon Cycle
   - Concentrations
   - Equilibrium
 - Methane
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Concentrations
 - Nitrous Oxide
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Concentrations
 - Halocarbons
   - Sources
   - Sinks
   - Concentrations
 - Ozone
 - Other Trace Gases
 - Adjustment Time
 - Summary
Greenhouse Forcing
 - Forcing Factors
 - GWPs
 - ΔF-ΔC Relationships
 - 1765 to 1990
 - Ozone
Aerosols
 - Aerosols
 - Radiative Forcing
   - Direct
   - Indirect
 - Total Forcing
Climate Variations
 - Surface Temperature
 - Precipitation
 - Other Variations
   - Stratosphere
   - Cryosphere
   - Circulation
   - Cloudiness
Detection
 - Modelling
 - Attribution
   - Latitudes
   - Stratosphere
   - Precipitation
   - Sea Level Rise
   - Fingerprints
 - When?
Future Climate
 - GCM Simulations
 - Feedbacks
   - Water Vapour
   - Clouds
   - Ice Albedo
   - Greenhouse Gases
 - 21st Century
Impacts
 - Agriculture
 - Forestry
 - Ecosystems
 - Water Resources
 - Oceans & Coasts
 - Humans & Health
Responses
 - Stabilising
 - FCCC
 - Kyoto Protocol
 - UK Programme
   - Energy Demand
   - Energy Supply
 - Evaluation
Conclusion
LINKS
Navigate

3.3.4.2. Palaeoclimatic reconstruction from terrigenous material

Weathering and erosion processes in different climatic zones on the continental land masses may produce characteristic inorganic products. When these are carried to the oceans (by wind, rivers or floating ice) and deposited on the ocean floor, they convey information about the climate of their origin or transportation route, at the time of deposition (e.g. Kolla et al., 1979).

Terrestrial detritus dilutes the relatively constant influx of calcium carbonate; the "purity" of a calcareous ooze shows an inverse relationship with the influx of terrestrial material. Because terrestrial influx is related to climatic factors, the "purity" of calcareous sediments therefore provides a palaeoclimatic indicator (e.g. Hays & Perruzza, 1972). Hence times of high carbonate abundance indicate low terrestrial influx, i.e. low rates of continental weathering. Conversely, carbonate minima correspond to increased levels of continental weathering.